April 13, 2010

Quick Evaluation

Whatever good has come of the existence of the Anglican Communion (and I think there is much good to which to point), it has not been because of the so-called Instruments of Communion, but from the bi- and tri- and sometimes quad- and more-lateral relationships of individual provinces and national churches, and in some cases dioceses and parishes — and the Instruments have only been of positive effect when they have aided and supported those processes.

The Instruments exist to serve, not to rule.

Tobias Stanislas Haller BSG

10 comments:

Daniel Weir said...

Finally, someone has spoken honestly about the Anglican Communion! Yes, I know others have pointed this out before, but I guess it needs to be said over and over again.

susan s. said...

Well said!!

Ueber-G said...

Amen

R said...

As my wife is fond of quoting Hercule Poirot these days:

Exactement.

Grandmère Mimi said...

The Instruments exist to serve, not to rule.

Now that's a "Thought for the Day".

F. Harry Stowe said...

What, the Anglican Communion is supposed to be a Christian organization?

JCF said...

...or, the Instruments should be "The Servant of the Servants of God" (Lately, it seems the Big Wigs of the Instruments would rather behave like That Other Guy who claims the "Servant of the Servants" title!)

MarkBrunson said...

Supposed being the key word, F. Harry Stowe!

Tim said...

Does the multi-lateral involvement of dioceses and provinces include GAFCON?

Tobias Stanislas Haller said...

Tim, yes. With the exception of two or three provinces (Uganda comes to mind) many dioceses and provinces of the global south are part of this picture. Check out the Continuing Indaba website, for instance. But beyond this formal listening process there are many other relationships. The Diocese of NY has a special relationship with Central Tanganyika, for example, and my parish is involved with that.